The REO Motor Car Company was a Lansing, Michigan based company that produced automobiles and trucks from 1905 to 1975.
Ransom E. Olds was an entrepreneur who founded multiple companies in the automobile industry. In 1897 Olds founded the Olds Motor Vehicle Company (later, as Oldsmobile, to become a part of General Motors). In 1905 Olds left Oldsmobile and established a new company, REO Motor Car Company, in Lansing, Michigan. Olds had 52 percent of the stock and the titles of president and general manager. Originally the company was to be called "R. E. Olds Motor Car Company," but the owner of Olds' previous company, then called Olds Motor Works, objected and threatened legal action on the grounds of likely confusion of names by consumers. Olds then changed the name to his initials. Olds Motor Works soon adopted the popular name of its vehicles, Oldsmobile (which, along with Buick and Cadillac, became founding divisions of General Motors Corporation).
The company's name was spelled alternately in all capitals REO or with only an initial capital as REO, and the company's own literature was inconsistent in this regard, with early advertising using all capitals and later advertising using the "REO" capitalization. The pronunciation, however, was as a single word. Lansing is home to the R. E. Olds Transportation Museum.
In 1915, Olds relinquished the title of general manager to his protege Richard H. Scott and eight years later he ended his tenure as the company's presidency as well, retaining the position of chairman of the board.
Although truck orders during World War II enabled it to revive somewhat, the company remained unstable in the postwar era, resulting in a bankruptcy reorganization. In 1954, the company was still underperforming, and sold vehicle manufacturing operations (the primary asset of the company) to the Bohn Aluminum and Brass Corporation of Detroit. Three years later, in 1957, it became a subsidiary of the White Motor Company. White then merged REO with Diamond T Trucks in 1967 to form Diamond-REO Trucks, Inc. In 1975, this company filed for bankruptcy in the Western District of Michigan and most of its assets were liquidated. Volvo later took over White and thus currently owns the rights to the REO brand name. The M35 started out in 1949 as a design by the REO Motor Car Company as a 2 1/2 ton three axle all wheel drive off road truck that was later nicknamed the Уdeuce and a halfФ. The first vehicle in the family, the M34, was quickly superseded in military usage by the M35, the major difference being the M35Тs 10-tire configuration versus the M34Тs 6-tire configuration.

Although the GMC CCKW was the most numerous of the WW II 2 1/2-ton, 6x6 cargo trucks, almost 200,000 of the Studebaker-designed US-6 (G-630) were produced by Studebaker and another 22,000 by REO from 1941-45. The cargo version was quite similar to the CCKW. The line haul version of the US6 was a 6x4 tractor for use with semi-trailers on improved roads. The 2 1/2 ton 6x6 truck (the "deuce and a half" or just "deuce") was one of the logistical innovations that helped the Allies win World War II. The full story about the deuce trucks, including the World War II vintage Studebaker & REO US6 Cargo Truck, is found on the linked page.
REO also built a Cardox airport firefighting truck on the 29XS chassis
the M34, was quickly superseded in military usage by the M35, the major difference being the M35Тs 10-tire configuration versus the M34Тs 6-tire configuration....5-speed manual transmission and divorced 2-speed transfer case (either a sprag-operated transfer case Rockwell 136-21 or air-operated selectable transfer case Rockwell 136-27).Although the A2 version is by far the most common, there are four different iterations: Standard, A1, A2, and A3 iterations. In 1994 the M35A3 variant was introduced as part of Extended Service Program, and between then and 1999. The curb weight of an M35 is between 13,000 pounds (5,900 kg) and 16,000 pounds (7,300 kg) empty, depending on configuration (cargo, wrecker, tractor, etc.).
The M35 2?-ton cargo truck is a long-lived 2? ton, triple-axle, 6x6 cargo truck initially used by the United States Army and subsequently utilized by many nations around the world. Over time it evolved into a family of specialized vehicles. It would not only inherit the World War II GMC CCKW's famous "Deuce and a Half" nickname but forge its own legacy.
The M35 started as a 1949 REO Motor Car Company design for a 2? ton three-axle all wheel drive off-road truck. This original 6-wheel M34 version was quickly superseded by the 10-wheel M35 design. While the basic M35 cargo truck is rated to carry 5,000 pounds (2,300 kg) off-road or 10,000 pounds (4,500 kg) on roads, they have been known to haul twice as much as rated. Trucks in this weight class are considered medium duty by the military and Department of Transportation.
The M35 family was introduced in 1950 to replace the GMC CCKW and M135 family cargo trucks that constituted the backbone of U.S. military transport since their introduction in World War II. The M35 would not completely replace the M135 family until the middle of the 1960s. However, the M35 would quickly become the dominant truck in its class in the U.S. military, serving with all the services in various capacities. For a short period the M35 was called "The Eager Beaver" by the U.S. Army due to its fording ability. But the name was never popular and forgotten in a few years.
The M35 series was to be replaced by the Light Medium Tactical Vehicle. However, many United States National Guard and Reserve units continued to use them as the new family of vehicles was phased in. The M35 series was used by the United States in Iraq during Operation Iraqi Freedom. The M35 Truck was not used by the United States Marine Corps and currently issued M35 to the U.S. Army Service.
The Canadian Army adopted license built versions of the M35 (and M36 variant) in 1982, built in Canada by Bombardier
. As of 2014, the trucks, designated MLVW (Medium Logistics Vehicle, Wheeled) were still in service. Canadian vehicles featured an automatic transmission, six wheels instead of ten (using single wheels on the tandem rear axles instead of dual wheels), and an ether-start for winter operations. Canada had been investigating a replacement under the Medium Support Vehicle System Project, and a vehicle has been selected. The MLVW's were initially not deployed with Canadian Forces in Afghanistan because of their lack of armor protection. An armor kit was subsequently developed leading to a limited deployment of the vehicles.

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